Office: CJ 4.325
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2545
E-mail: email hidden; JavaScript is required
Office Hours:

Mon 4:30 PM to 6:00 PM
Wed 4:30 PM to 6:00 PM


Call or e-mail to arrange an appointment on an ad hoc basis.

NB. On one Wednesday every month, we have a faculty meeting, so students who wish to meet me on that day will have to make a special appointment at an alternative time.


Courses

Winter

Coms 367Media and Cultural Context

Coms 468Communications, Development, and Colonialism


Links

Something New in the Air: The Story of First Peoples Television Broadcasting in Canada
Description and extracts from the only comprehensive history/policy text on the story of Canadian First
Peoples television.

Looking at Shirley, the Ultimate Norm: Colour Balance, Image Technologies, and Cognitive Equity
Issue 34.1 (2009) Reality/Television

Abstract: Until recently, due to a light-skin bias embedded in colour film stock emulsions and digital camera design, the rendering of non-Caucasian skin tones was highly deficient and required the development of compensatory practices and technology improvements to redress its shortcomings. Using the emblematic ‘Shirley’ norm reference card as a central metaphor reflecting the changing state of race relations/aesthetics, this essay analytically traces the colour adjustment processes in the industries of visual representation and identifies some prototypical changes in the field. The author contextualizes the history of these changes using three theoretical categories: the ‘technological unconscious’ (Vaccari, 1981), ‘dysconsciousness’ (King, 2001), and an original concept of ‘cognitive equity,’ which is proposed as an intelligent strategy for creating and promoting equity by inscribing a wider dynamic range of skin tones into image technologies, products, and emergent practices in the visual industries.

Home on the Range: Kids, Visual Culture and Cognitive Equity
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies, Vol. 9, No. 2, 141-148 (2009)

Abstract: This essay focuses on Binney and Smith’s creation and marketing of Crayola fleshtone art products from the late 1950s until the mid-1990s, analyzing the company’s shifting nomenclature — from ‘flesh’ to ‘peach’ to its multicultural collection. After reflecting on the significance of Crayola’s color adjustment for children’s sociocultural and aesthetic evelopment and for teacher’s pedagogical repertoires around diversity issues, I introduce an original notion–cognitive equity. I propose this as a refined way of understanding racial and cultural equity issues that don’t just revolve around statistics and access to institutions, but also inscribes a new normative vision of skin color equity directly into technologies, products, and body representations in a range of visual media. At the very early stage of children’s cognitive evelopment when stereotypes and racisms are being formed, this would be a particularly intelligent design strategy in which to
reinforce multiculturalism and multiracialism in all aspects of their visual culture and the commodities that are available to them.

[ssba]

Lorna Roth

Professor

BA, Sociology, Sir George Williams University

MA, Communications, McGill University

PhD, Communications, Concordia University, Montreal

Teaching Interests: Media and Minorities, Neo-Colonial Theory and “Development,” Race, Representation, & Technologies, International Communication, Indigenous Television and Media History, New Media and First Peoples, Mediating Oral Histories, Oral History as Cultural Performance, Civic Journalism.

I am currently involved in a major interdisciplinary SSHRC-funded Community University Research Alliance (CURA) project on Oral Life Stories of Refugees Displaced to Montreal due to genocide, abuse, human rights violations. It is a project run out of the Public History sector of the History Department. I have two roles in the project: co-ordinating and facilitating radio dissemination of our research for the next 4 years and researching the (in)visibility of the human face in the personal and mediated testimonial.

Other Current Research and Book Project (in Progress): Colour Balance: Race, Technologies, and “Intelligent Design”, a book in which I am examining the ways in which skin colour has been imagined, embedded and colour-shifted over time in products and technologies.

Chapters include:

Picturing Diversity, a photo essay on race and representation.

Flesh in Wax and Other Tales of Many Colours.

“Look! They Painted That White Girl Black!” Reflections on the Ethnicization of Display Mannequins.

More Than Skin Deep: The Color Balance Project in North American Industries of Visual Representation.

Technological Passing.

The Colour Balance Project: A Cosmetic Recognition of Difference?

The Colour Balance Project: Preliminary Reflections on its Contribution to Alternative Media Theory.

Looking for Shirley, the Ultimate Norm.

Forthcoming Publications related to this project:

Roth, Lorna. (2010). ‘Flesh in Wax : Demystifying the Skin Colors of the Common Crayon,’ in Jonathan Finn (Ed.). Images in Action: Readings in Visual Communication and Culture. Oxford University Press.

Roth, Lorna. (2010). “First Peoples’ Television in Canada: Origins of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network,” in Marian Bredin and Sigurjon Baldur Hafsteinsson (eds,) Indigenous Screen Cultures. University of Manitoba Press.

Aboriginal Media Publications:

Book:

Roth, Lorna. 2005. Something New in the Air: The Story of First Peoples Television in Canada. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press.

Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals and Chapters in Books:

Roth, Lorna. Forthcoming. 2010. “First Peoples’ Television in Canada: Origins of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network,” in Marian Bredin and Sigurjon Baldur Hafsteinsson (eds,) Indigenous Screen Cultures. University of Manitoba Press.

Roth, Lorna. Forthcoming. 2010. “The Social Movement of Indigenous Media in Canada'” in John Downing (ed.), Encyclopedia of Social Movement Media. London: Sage Publications.

Roth, Lorna. 2009. “Canadian First Peoples’ Mediascapes: A Snapshot with Three Corners,” in Mediascapes. Leslie Shade (ed.) Thomson Publications.

Roth, Lorna. 2007. ‘(re)Colouring the Public Broadcasting System in Canada: A Case Study of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network,’ in Fuller, Linda K. (ed.) Community Media: International Perspectives (Aboriginal/ Indigenous Experiences, Current Case Studies, Virtual Community Visions). London: Sage Publications.

Roth, Lorna. October, 2006. ‘Snapshots & Dialogues: Canadian Ethnic Television Broadcasting and Social Cohesion,’ in New Citizens, New Policies? Developments in diversity Policy in Canada and Flanders. Gent: Academia Press, pp. 171 ‘ 200.

Roth, Lorna. 2005. (Revised and republished). ‘First Peoples’ Television in Canada’s North: A Case Study of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network,’ in Mediascapes: New Patterns in Canadian Communication. Attallah, Paul and Leslie Shade (eds.). Toronto: Nelson Thomson Learning. Original Publication in 2002.

Lorna and Faye Ginsberg, 2005. ‘Thinking Outside the Box: Indigenous Television,’ in Creeber, Glen, ed. Studying TV: An Introduction. London: British Film Institute.

Roth, Lorna and Faye Ginsburg. 2003. “Thinking Outside the Box: Indigenous Television in Australia and Canada,” in Miller, Toby (ed.). The Television Book. London: British Film Institute.

Roth, Lorna. 2002. “First Peoples’ Television in Canada’s North: A Case Study of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network,” in Mediascapes: New Patterns in Canadian Communication. Attallah, Paul and Leslie Shade (eds.). Toronto: Nelson Thomson Learning.

Roth, Lorna. 1999. “How Comfortably Does the Internet Sit on Canada’s Tundra? Reflections on Public Access to the Information Highway in the North” in d”Haenens, Leen (ed.). Cyberidentities: Canadian & European Presence in Cyberspace. University of Ottawa Press, p. 83 – 97.

Roth, Lorna. 1998. “Television Broadcasting North of 60,” in Images of Canadianness. Visions on Canada’s Politics, Culture, Economics. Leen d’Haenens, ed. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press – International Canadian Studies Series, p. 147 – 166.

Roth, Lorna. 1996. “Northern Voices and Mediating Structures: First Peoples’ Television Broadcasting North of 60,” in Holmes, Helen and David Taras (eds.). Seeing Ourselves: Media Power and Policy in Canada. Second Edition. Toronto: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Canada Inc., p. 173 – 191.

Roth, Lorna, with Bev Nelson and Marie David. 1995. “Three Women, a Mouse, a Microphone, and a Telephone: Information (Mis)Management During the Mohawk/Canadian Governments’ Conflict of 1990,” in Feminism, Multiculturalism, and the Media: Global Diversities. Angara Valdivia (ed.), Pennsylvania State University. Sage Publication, p. 48 – 81.

Roth, Lorna. 1995. “Radio Mohawk et dialogues culturels: Réflexions sur l’émission ‘The Party Line’ de Radio-Kahnawake,” in Sauvageau, Florion, Pierre Trudel, Marie-Héléne Lavoie (eds.). Les tribuns de la radio: échos de la crise d’Oka. Québec: Institut québécois de recherche sur la culture, p. 85 – 102.

Roth, Lorna. 1995. “(de)Romancing the North,” Borderlines. Special Issue on Race. Issue No. 36: 36 – 43.

Roth, Lorna. 1993. “Mohawk Airwaves and Cultural Challenges: Some Reflections on the Politics of Recognition and Cultural Appropriation After the Summer of 1990,” Canadian Journal of Communications – Special Thematic Issue on Indigenous Peoples and Communications. Volume 18. No. 3. Summer: 315 – 331.

Roth, Lorna. 1993. “Constituency-based Broadcasting Policy: A Canadian Perspective”, Chapter in Brian Lewis (ed.). Conference Proceedings. Comparative Japanese/Canadian Communication and Cultural Policies.

Roth, Lorna. 1992. “Media and the Commodification of Crisis,” chapter in Raboy, Marc and Bernard Dagenais (eds.). Media, Crisis and Democracy: Essays on Mass Communication and the Disruption of Social Order. Sage Publication: Media, Culture and Society Book Series, p. 144 – 161.

Roth, Lorna, with Gail Valaskakis. 1989. “Aboriginal Broadcasting in Canada: A Case Study in Democratization,” in Raboy, Marc and Peter A. Bruck (eds.) Communication For and Against Democracy. Montreal: Black Rose Books, p. 221 – 234.

Roth, Lorna. 1991. “The Role of CBC Northern Service in the Federal Election Process”. Study commissioned by the Royal Commission on Electoral Reform and Party Financing. Fletcher, Frederick J. (ed.). Election Broadcasting in Canada. Volume 21. Toronto: Dundurn Press, p. 303 – 346.

Publications on Media and Minorities:

Roth, Lorna. (1998 ) “The Delicate Acts of “Colour Balancing:” Multiculturalism and Canadian Television Broadcasting Policies and Practices,” in Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol. 23, No. 4. Autumn, p. 487 – 506.

Roth, Lorna. (1998 ) “The Delicate Acts of “Colour Balancing:” Multiculturalism and Canadian Television Broadcasting Policies and Practices,” in Australian-Canadian Studies. Special Communication Issue. Vol. 16, No. 2, p. 65 – 82.

Roth, Lorna. 2,000. “Reflections on the Colour of the Internet,” in Journalism and Communication. Chinese (Mandarin) Translation by Dr. Zhenshi Guo.. Beijing: Beijing Broadcasting Institute. Vol. 7. No. 3, pp. 78 – 84.

Roth, Lorna. 1996. “The Politics and Ethics of “Inclusion”. Alia, Valerie, Brian Brennan and Barry Hofmaster (eds.). Deadlines and Diveristy: Journalism Ethics in a Changing World. Halifax: Fernwood Press, p. 72 – 91.


Last update: December 09, 2013 – 12:21